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5 agosto 2010

Chris Anderson – ” The Long Tail “

[amazon_link id=”1401309666″ target=”_blank” ]Long Tail, The, Revised and Updated Edition: Why the Future of Business is Selling Less of More[/amazon_link][amazon_image id=”1401309666″ link=”true” target=”_blank” size=”medium” ]Long Tail, The, Revised and Updated Edition: Why the Future of Business is Selling Less of More[/amazon_image]In The Long Tail, Chris Anderson offers a visionary look at the future of business and common culture. The long-tail phenomenon, he argues, will “re-shape our understanding of what people actually want to watch” (or read, etc.). While Anderson presents a fascinating idea backed by thoughtful (if repetitive) analysis, many critics questioned just how greatly the niche market will rework our common popular culture. Anderson convinced most reviewers in his discussion of Internet media sales, but his KitchenAid and Lego examples fell flat. A few pointed out that online markets constitute just 10 percent of U.S. retail, and brick-and-mortar stores will never disappear. Anderson’s thesis came under a separate attack by Lee Gomes in his Wall Street Journal column. Anderson had defined the “98 Percent Rule” in his book to mean that no matter how much inventory is made available online, 98 percent of the items will sell at least once. Yet Gomes cited statistics that could indicate that, as the Web and Web services become more mainstream, the 98 Percent Rule may no longer apply: “Ecast [a music-streaming company] told me that now, with a much bigger inventory than when Mr. Anderson spoke to them two years ago, the quarterly no-play rate has risen from 2% to 12%. March data for the 1.1 million songs of Rhapsody, another streamer, shows a 22% no-play rate; another 19% got just one or two plays.” If Anderson overreaches in his thesis, he has nonetheless written “one of those business books that, ironically, deserves more than a niche readership” (Houston Chronicle).

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